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Embarrassing Conditions: Bed-Wetting during Sex

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The world is full of of embarrassing conditions you wouldn’t wish on your worst enemy. Every week, Carian discusses one. This week: Urination during sex.

(Unwanted) urination during intercourse is not exactly a topic that people openly discuss. But actually it seems to be a common phenomenon among women. A study has found that 24% of 324 women visiting a gynecological urology clinic had incontinence during sex. In two-thirds, the leakage occurred on penetration and in one-third only at orgasm.

An irritable bladder or a weakness at the neck of the bladder is particularly linked to urination during sex. About 1 in 5 women who have difficulty holding urine during the day also experience leakage during intercourse.

It is also thought that incontinence during sex is sometimes mistaken for female ejaculation: “the expulsion of large quantities of clear transparent fluid at the height of orgasm (Dr. Gräfenberg; 1950).” There is a lot of confusion about this topic, but according to research, this sudden leakage of liquid is just urine.

If urination during sex is causing a real problem, what can you do?

  • Empty your bladder before having sex.
  • Cut down on caffeine-containing drinks and alcohol.
  • Do not drink excessive amounts of fluid – not more than 1.5 liters over 24 hours.
  • Discuss the problem with your doctor, especially if you have leakage at other times. Your doctor can prescribe medication that has effects on the bladder.
  • If none of this works it’s possible to undergo an operation to strengthen the bladder neck.

Source: Embarrassing Problems

Hines, T. (2001). The G-spot: A modern gynecologic myth American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 185 (2), 359-362 DOI: 10.1067/mob.2001.115995

HILTON, P. (1988). Urinary incontinence during sexual intercourse: a common, but rarely volunteered, symptom BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 95 (4), 377-381 DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.1988.tb06609.x

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